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was more curious about the united states, the civil rights movement in this country than he was interested in talking about himself. again, that's evidence of what a curious mind is, what an open-minded person nelson mandela was. >> he got out of prison in 1990, well after the civil rights movement had undertaken in earnest in this country. he was fascinated by it. do you think he learned from it? >> he certainly did. one of the things that strikes me as you ask the question is that he was asking me about not only the civil rights movement. remember, there is a big difference in south africa the majority is black. in the united states the majority is white. mandela was fascinated with the idea that here in the united states black people were able to have a civil rights move lt and a nonviolent civil rights movement and achieve rights for themselves under the constitution. he was taken with the founding fathers. he knew about it. in south africa you have a majority black population, no constitution, no rights. he was curious how did that black american minority manage to get rights and free
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
of the years he now was experiencing. >> i was so struck by john lewis saying that as a young civil rights leader and activist, he was so influenced -- he and his fellow college students saying they were so influenced by mandela and mandela saying when they met that he had been following the civil rights movement in the united states. you were front and center as part of that movement, the civil rights movement here. you had that experience also in talking to him, the cross-fertilization of these freedom movements. >> yes, i think they fed off of each other. i think while the united states civil rights movement came of age and its victory much earlier than the apartheid struggle, they were very much alike. i think that's what enabled me, i think, to have the success to the extent i did to have it. i didn't go as a journalist going in an objective way, i was informed by the experiences we had in the south and in the united states. so when i got there, i understand. there were significant differences. in south africa the majority were the black people and they had been suppressed by a minori
, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
, i know from being a teenager in new york and the civil rights struggle going forward you were one of the first writers at "new york times" that really wrote about this movement. and for people to really understand the weight and gravity of nelson mandela, they have to understand what it was that he fought. give people a sense of what apartheid in south africa was and then how nelson mandela and the african national congress was able to break this gridlock of oppression and move this nation toward liberation. >> well, reverend al, i first went to south africa in 1985 which was one of the darkest times in the country where the apartheid regime was just wreaking havoc on black people in all of their townships. you know, the black people were isolated. they lived in townships that could easily be surrounded by the white and black in that case arms of the state. and this was a time when people were being beaten. they were being executed in all kinds of extralegal ways that we only learned about many years ago. with all kinds of poisons that their scientists, one doctor was a heart spec
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
-racist, non-sexist country which certainly has a compatible legacy in our country's dr. king and civil rights movement here, which it's interesting there was a symbiosis between the civil rights movement and south african movement, they took a tremendous amount of inspiration from dr. king in the civil rights movement in the united states, if you think about 196 3, he went to prison in 1964. >> there is no doubt which gets me to the next question from professor ogletree, in terms of the impact that the anti parti movement around the world had and here in the united states had on the end of a paratide, how significant was it? >> it was very significant. remember, anderson, this was during the regan administration and ronald reagan opposed what we were doing and have towed issues to talk about opening up the system in south africa to end the partide. thousands of people got arrested in washington d.c. and i got a group of lawyers together to represent them for nothing. they were released and not charged with an offense. it was a national issue, black, white, male, female, people on the left, ri
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
luther king jr. and the country's civil rights and you were on south africa on the day mandela walked out of prison. tell us about that moment. >> you know, it was a moment difficult to describe. he took us on unbelievable heights of joy that day. and the depths of pain. a huge larger than life figure. i've gotten into south africa quite by chance in 1979 and connected with his family and we instructed in the 1990. and we had the feeling he would be released this weekend so my son and i met him there. what surprised me was he recognized me and call my name. he had seen the convention speech from the democratic convention. he came out and stopped. i'm sure the governor will say that he was unbelievably slumped. he came out not just reading speeches but up for debate. >> what do you think his enduring legacy will be around the world? is it the concept that i've heard you speak? the concept of forgiveness and reconciliation? >> i think it is the thing everybody says. that he was the true towering moral figure of our time. why do people say that he is the leader that they most respect? everyb
midnight in south africa, the president made the announcement the civil rights icon and leader to the world had passed. >> i'm shere shepherd smith in york. we have learn ed from the president of south africa that the civil rights icon nelson mandela died a short time ago at the age of 95. mandela was the first black president of south africa and an enduring icon of the struggle against racial opposition. he died according to the announcement of the governor leaving the nation without the moral center at a time of growing dissatisfaction with the country's leaders. those words lead the new york sometimes article that came out moments ago. mr. mandela spent 27 years in prison after being convicted of treason. by negotiating with captors after his release in 1990, mandela led the african national congress long a banned liberation movement to an lek to recall victory in 1994, first fully democratic election in that country's history. the new york times goes on, mandela served one term as the president and had not been seen in public since the year 2010 when the nation hosted the world cup socc
in america, so much of the american civil rights movement was reminding african-americans and still is, reminding young children of color, you are equal, you do deserve the exact same things. i think that made a huge difference. >> i think part of that was if you understand he was born in royalty. he was born to a certain manner. his self-concept, he that naturally and he never lost it. because he didn't have that insecurity, he didn't need all that to become a leader. his vanity never outran his sanity. >> talking about the legacy of nelson mandela, we're talking about how those qualities of grace, dignity, humility have been inherited or visited on later generations. i want to play an excerpt from your interview with the president last night where he himself takes a remarkably humble posture as far as being commander in chief, president of the united states. lets take a listen to that. >> the interesting thing about now having been president for five years. it makes you humbler as opposed to cockier as to what you as an individual can do. you recognize you're just part of the sweep o
-- the civil rights movement. they want their own civil rights movement. so they go after kids who wear indian costumes on halloween and katy perry for dressing up in a kimono. let me tell you, my liberal friends, that is not in the same galaxy. probably not in the same universe as the march from selma to montgomery. >> it's worse than that. in over to ttalitarian culture they ban things like this. you can't do this, can't do that. under this banner printed in the huffington post i should be mad at danny thomas, lebanese comedian, father of marlo thomas who is now married to phil donahue. his theme song was "danny boy," an irish song because he's lebanese. >> how about this, bill? should we consider johnny dep a racist because he played tonto in "the lone ranger"? >> absolutely. >> i have two more. should we consider keith carradine who played a buddhist monk on "kung fu." did meryl streep appropriate jewish culture when she played a holocaust survivor in "sophie's choice"? they are performers playing a role. liberals used to be sensible. they have lost their mind. >> certainly on the katy per
by hard it's been because stuff that's worth it is always hard. the civil rights movement was hard. get women the right to vote, that was hard. making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. you know, it's never been easy for us to change how we do business in this country. this has been the case for social security, for medicare, for all of the great social progress that we've made in this country. >> krystal, it sounds like he's trying to get them to remember the reason they got involved in his presidential campaign. >> yeah, i think so. and i think it's important that we keep the perspective on why it's taken so long to reform our health insurance. it is because it's hard and there are parts that are disruptive and it makes people uncomfortable but ultimately we have put our faith and trust in this law and in this president and i think we're going to be better off for it. >> zeke emanuel and krystal ball, thank you. >>> coming up, a last word exclusive, those three high school athletes who were arrested in rochester, new york, this week while they were waiting fo
nuclear negotiations and the syrian civil war. let's bring in washington right now. the president spoke about several issues to this group of israeli leaders and u.s. leaders. were they comfortable with his answers about iran and the recent deal to curtail iran's nuclear program? >> well, in some ways, fred, i think he said exactly what the audience wanted to hear in terms of the fact that no option is off the table. he said he wasn't sure if this agreement with iran was going to work, but if it didn't, he would still keep that military option on the take. but he also laid out some very strong red lines for a possible deal with iran. let's take a listen to what he had to say about the need for everyone to be realistic about what's possible. >> one can envision an ideal world in which iran said, we'll destroy every element and facility and you name it, it's all gone. i can envision a world in which congress passed every one of my bills that i put forward. i mean, there are a lot of things that i can envision that would be wonderful. but precisely because we don't trust the nature of the
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
, this couple. >> they filed a complaint. >> what happens now? >> the office of civil rights is going to look at that complaint and see if his civil rights were denied. by denying him the transplant, were they denying it because of his disability. if they find that he was, it's going to be a problem for the hospital. >> thanks so much. we'll be right back. across the country has brought me to the lovely city of boston. cheers. and seeing as it's such a historic city, i'm sure they'll appreciate that geico's been saving people money for over 75 years. oh... dear, i've dropped my tea into the boston harbor. huhh... i guess this party's over. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. aveeno®. so when my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis them. was also on display, i'd had it. i finally had a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescrib
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
are protesting against a lack of immigration policy. you have the civil rights agenda that's coming into fruition. you've got the supreme court now taking up an aspect of obama care, but also that touches on first amendment rights. so a whole lot of pieces of this puzzle that are going to -- i think can be problematic for both parties. but certainly for the republican party if they don't understand how to message themselves and put in place, i think, substantive policies that begin to address some of these issues. >> and you know, john, it's interesting. you get the sense that republicans do sort of see that. eric cantor this week talking about the fact that the gop needs to be able to answer a basic question, how do we address the fundamental problems that people have. with all of that menu of issues you heard michael steele mention, do republicans now run the risk of hubris, thinking obama care means we can go whole hog. we don't have to worry about really appearing uncompassionate when a lot of americans are changing their minds about things like minimum wage or food stamps or i might be one o
luther king jr. and other civil rights leaders. they are cast as figures with no history or context, just celebrated as the good guys who fought the forces of evil. consider the 2005 eulogy for parks from bill frist, flagged today. frisk said it was "not an intentional attempt to change a nation but a singular act aimed at restoring the dignity of the individual." and that gets it exactly wrong. rosa parks was an actual human being who was embedded in a whole bunch of institutions and organizations that were very much trying to change the nation. she was part of not just the liberal left, but the radical left. she trained at the highlander folk school in tennessee, a legendary leftist training ground regarded as a come cyst training school by southern segregationist. she was secretary of the montgomery naacp when arrested, an organization with deep roots in the city's trade union movement, which it helped organize her protest. she years earlier helped organize a campaign for young african-americans to borrow books from whites-only libraries. in other words, rosa parks was not some fuzzy t
they were supposed to do. and still, yet, they get arrested. >> under federal civil right laws there have been cases in the second circuit that have gone a lot further. if i was a law enforcer, i would think about dismissing charges. >> today, the monroe county district attorney said in a statement after reviewing the facts associated with these arrests, i have decided to dismiss the charges in the interest of justice. joining me now is james peterson, associate professor of english at lehigh university. also an msnbc contributor. this looked like the outcome that had to happen, after our program last night, the mayor of rochester came out against this. i was deliberately on this show last night doing everything i could, including booking dan french, to push this prosecutor back and to push the police back on this arrest. >> that's right, and listen, kudos to you, your show, and your producers for making this national news. we have to give credit where it's due. really important here, lawrence. i'm teaching a class right now in black prison narrative. i'm studying michelle alexander and t
to services and civil rights all dramatically improving as well. now, i did not have as many encounters with nelson mandela as our good friend bob johnson did, but one of the most memorable days of my life, it was bill clinton's inaugural, the morning of. i was on the capitol grounds. i happened to be walking around at the time and i literally bumped into nelson mandela. he was being escorted by ron brown, and i have to tell you, he is and was one of those people, he had an aura. when you were in his presence, you felt differently, your life changed and it's a memory that i have personally cherished for the better part of some 20 years. we have lost one of the great humanitarians of any age. >> all right. thank you very much. thanks for telling us that great story. now, folks, to repeat the big news tonight, nelson mandela has died today at the age of 95. many thanks to hampton pearson and tyler matheson and john harwood. we will be right back with much more of "the kudlow report." (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can
. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them first. >>> in the united states our country's leaders past and present. we heard from president obama last night. let's go to the white house now and hear from brianna keilar. this was a personal moment for barack obama who talked about the influence of nelson mandela when he was a young man. >> reporter: tha
. although he did relax a little bit when i told him about my experience in the civil rights movement, but it brought to mind for him maya angelou, do you know her? talked about how he had -- they had read her work in prison. but then, as i watched him over the years as he spent more and more time in the outside world, he became a little more relaxed and talked more and more about what it was like in prison. and talk more and more about his own vision. he was always a very humble man. he never really -- although he was the leader, he never took credit. for example, when i asked him at a day back in his yard a few days after prison, when everybody thought he was going to be president, do you foresee a time when you will become president of this country? he said, well, you know, that's up to my -- i'm a loyal member of the african national congress and whatever they decide. behind the scene i understand he could rule with a kind of iron hand when necessary. but the face -- his face to the public was always of a genial giant. >> way he comported himself and humility is very genuine descr
colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 inter
know, i was part of the civil rights movement in the south. he said oh, do you know maya angelou? she meant so much to me, reading her in prison. you were in his heart and mind all those years. >> he told charlene gault that people had been slipping my books into him all the years. i spoke with one journalist who said, can you imagine being in the hell hole of a south african prison reading the caged bird. >> this means so much to us. i know you've been through a lot in the last days. we just want to say thank you for recollections, thank you for your poetry, and thank you for being with us today. >> thank you miss mitchell. i admire. i watch you with great gratitude and appreciation. >> that is an enormous honor. >> that you very much for your own gentleness. you report on some hellish situations around the world but i never hear the hell in your voice. thank you. >> thank you for that. very much so. >> thank you. >> good-bye to you. coming up next, nelson mandela's leadership, his legacy. but first "nbc nightly news" anchor brian williams sat down in south africa with former preside
include allegations that employees of the department deprived jail prisoners of civil rights, also obstruction of justice allegations. apparent attempts to cover up the truth after it became clear that cases were under investigation. some of the most outlandish alleged behavior started after it became known that an informant in the jail was working with the fbi. the u.s. attorney's office said employees of the sheriff's department went so far as to try to get a judge to release names of everybody involved in the investigation and when that didn't work, allegedly tried to put the squeeze on an fbi agent. >> despite a judge's refusal to issue this order because he had no jurisdiction over the federal agency, two los angeles county sheriff's deputies, sergeants, allegedly confronted an fbi special agent outside her residence in an attempt to intimidate her into providing details about the investigation. >> reporter: now, in the past, sheriff lee bacca has said it was the fbi who was breaking the law and said there was really no attempt to intimidate the fbi agent. it doesn't really so
various black factions. and the white right wing goes to great lengths to disrupt the negotiations. >> mandela really believed the country was potentially on the brink of civil war. >> reporter: the violence peaks on easter sunday 1993 when a high-ranking anc member is shot outside his home by a white right-wing polish immigrant. >> there was uproar in the country. riots. >> reporter: the country finds itself in a moment of crisis. de klerk and the government are unable to keep the peace. there was only one man who could pull the nation back from the abyss. mandela addresses the country on national television. >> tonight why i'm reaching out to every single south african, black and white, now is the time for all south africans to stand together. >> only he could control the country in a crisis. and effectively, he was president from then on. de klerk was eclipsed. >> reporter: negotiations proceed, building towards a momentous event. >> the first time they were called for dignity was on the 7th of april, 1994. >> reporter: for the first time in its almost 400-year history, south af
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
. >> all right, merry christmas. >> you too. >> speaking of the holidays, by the way, send me a tweet on your thoughts on that. is this the end of civilization? michael has thoughts of that coming up. do we really like and trust each other, or refrain from hurting each other in this christmas season. >>> you could soon get deliveries to your front door. this 30-minute drone delivery possible? and do you really want amazon dropping the 50-inch television on your doorstep like that? >>> plus, the number two guy, on the republican side of the senate, saying, that this administration has taken lying it a new low. we get reaction from one of president obama's top former campaign staffers, join us in a moment. campaign staffers. join us in moments. ick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. i dbefore i dosearch any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
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